“Loren Montgomery – Manipulating Defenses With Multiple Formations EP 007” Run The Power : A Football Coach’s Podcast

On Episode 007 of RTP we talk with Loren Montgomery, Head Coach at Bixby HS in Bixby, OK. Coach Montgomery has tremendous knowledge in all areas of program development, and he has a thirst for more knowledge and understanding on a daily basis. Coach Montgomery has won 3 State Titles at Bixby in 2014, 2015, and 2016. Prior to Bixby, he was OC/OL coach at Jenks HS for 10 seasons, where he was part of 5 State Championships. Listen to Rowdy and Walz talk with Coach Montgomery about starting one of the best OL/DL camps in the USA (Eastern OK OL/DL Camp), being a HC, OC, and OL coach, developing a coaching staff through clinics and education, and developing your strength and conditioning program to win titles. You can follow Coach Montgomery on Twitter @BixbySpartanFB.

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This episode of Run The Power is brought to you by Audible. Audible has worked with us and is now offering our listeners a FREE Month and Audio Book of your choice at RTPBOOK.com! They have best selling audio books by and for coach’s, and you can cancel your subscription at anytime with no cost and still get to keep your audiobook as a gift from them. To get your FREE Month and Audiobook visit RTPBOOK.com

This episode of the podcast is also brought to you by Team Attack Academy. Team Attack Academy is an online football development site for football players and coaches of all levels. It is the most powerful teaching tool introduced into the game today to raise level of playing and coaching football. After using Team Attack Academy your athletes and coaches will outplay, outwork and outsmart their opponents guaranteed. Visit Team Attack Academy at https://teamattackacademy.com

David Alexander – Importance of Coach Development and Lower-Level Experience

David Alexander is the head football coach at Broken Arrow and a former professional offensive linemen. He played ten seasons in the NFL for the Philadelphia Eagles and the New York Jets. He played college ball at the University of Tulsa and was drafted in the fifth round of the 1987 NFL Draft.

He worked as an assistant coach for seven years at Jenks High School. In 2005-06, he was also head coach of the Tulsa Talons of the af2 arena football league. In 2013, he left Jenks to move to Broken Arrow, where had played and graduated in 1982, as the running backs coach. In January 2014 he was announced as Broken Arrow’s new head football coach.

Coach A is also one of my best friends in the coaching business. We have had the opportunity to share many moments together, some great, some very difficult. But I have always enjoyed our conversations about life and football because he has a great heart and great insight into many situations because of this unique education and experiences. He played for Buddy Ryan and Bill Muir (if you don’t know Bill Muir as an OL coach, sit in the corner for 5 minutes and think about the choices you have made in this life and then Google him). He had to block Reggie White and Jerome Brown on a daily basis in practice and then turn around to block Lawrence Taylor or Eric Swann on a Sunday or Monday night in front of millions of people. He has had more injuries than I can name, yet he managed to keep playing for 10 straight seasons in the toughest football league in the world at one of the most difficult positions.

I say these things because it would have been very easy for a guy like Coach A to be arrogant or unapproachable. To be above certain jobs. To be above coaching “lower level” football. He most certainly wasn’t. His first coaching job straight out of the NFL was in junior high ball, in addition to coaching his sons in JTA youth football.

One of the reasons we started working on Team Attack Academy and Run The Power is because of several conversations I had with Coach A and Coach Trimble. They were always mentioning how difficult it was to find GOOD middle school and high school coaches, especially young ones. I also couldn’t understand how some coaches were resistant to work or development in a job they supposedly loved very much. It baffled all of us.

I asked Coach A these three questions to sum up some of these thoughts about hiring coaches and developing coaches.

Why is it so difficult to find quality coaches at ALL LEVELS of your program (8th-Varsity)?

The biggest hurdle we face in Oklahoma is that we are ranked 49th in teacher pay. Good young coaches leave here for Arkansas or Texas, where they immediately receive a 30-40% raise.  And many young men coming out of college with a degree can get any job, in any field, and their starting pay will be $25,000+ what a teacher/coach will make in Oklahoma.

That being said, I have found it near impossible to find motivated, YOUNG coaches to take 8th/9th grade coaching jobs. The young coaches (almost everyone I have interviewed) will ONLY accept a varsity spot, and many want to be considered for coordinator spots.  My best Jr. High coaches are “Lifers” –  experienced, older varsity coaches that want to continue coaching but are ready to slow down from the grind of varsity football.

We ask our players to develop physically and mentally throughout their careers. Why are some coaches resistant to developing themselves to become better coaches, in your opinion?

This is a question that I have thought about a lot!

Developing and growing takes a long term plan, which means it takes time, and a certain amount of humility.

As a society right now, we think of TIME this way: if it doesn’t happen immediately, then I will just move on and find someplace else where I can get my satisfaction.

Being humble and working for the vision of the Head Coach or program is imperative. All motivated people think they can do as good or better than the Head Coach, and they have a vision of what they would do with a team. BUT NOTHING works (a team, a school, a society) if we do not learn from our superiors and teach our subordinates.

Do your job to the best of your ability, and you will be rewarded with opportunities for more responsibility. Humbling yourself to tasks that do not put the spot light on you may not build your ego, but I hope it builds your character and your self-esteem.

When I started coaching, I had just finished a ten year NFL career. The first four years I coached Jr. High football, one at the 9th grade and 3 more at the 8th grade. Looking back, I learned as much during those years as I did during the 6 years I worked for Allan Trimble at Jenks.

Why is it so important to develop professionally and personally as a coach?

I will NEVER hire a coach if he tells me, “I already have all the answers” or “I know everything.” We must all continue growing and learning, or we will fall hopelessly behind. As a head coach, I can tell pretty quickly which assistants LOVE their job and are sponges for knowledge. When I am looking for a varsity assistant now, my number one criteria that I want to hear in an interview is, “I love this job!”

 Follow Coach Alexander on Twitter @da_alex72 or @BATigersFootbal

“Adam Gaylor – Creating player buy-in EP 006” Run The Power : A Football Coach’s Podcast

Run The Power (RTP) episode 006 returns for a conversation with Adam Gaylor, the Defensive Coordinator at Mustang HS in Mustang, OK. Coach Gaylor is one of the best defensive coaches in America. He has coached at the college level (U of Central Oklahoma) and several stints at the HS level (HC Westmoore HS, DC Broken Arrow HS, DC Wagoner HS). He was always difficult to prepare for when we coached against him. Coach Gaylor has a vast knowledge of all defenses, having run both 3-4 and 4-2-5 defenses with a variety of coverages and pressures. You won’t find many coaches that love talking ball more than Coach Gaylor. Listen to Rowdy and Walz talk with Coach Gaylor about building relationships with players and holding them accountable, the current trends in defense and pressures, defensive practice scenarios, film breakdown and study, and having a productive presence on Twitter as a coach . You can follow Coach Gaylor on Twitter @CoachAdamGaylor.

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This episode of Run The Power is brought to you by Audible. Audible has worked with us and is now offering our listeners a FREE Month and Audio Book of your choice at RTPBOOK.com! They have best selling audio books by and for coach’s, and you can cancel your subscription at anytime with no cost and still get to keep your audiobook as a gift from them. To get your FREE Month and Audiobook visit RTPBOOK.com

This episode of the podcast is also brought to you by Team Attack Academy. Team Attack Academy is an online football development site for football players and coaches of all levels. It is the most powerful teaching tool introduced into the game today to raise level of playing and coaching football. After using Team Attack Academy your athletes and coaches will outplay, outwork and outsmart their opponents guaranteed. Visit Team Attack Academy at https://teamattackacademy.com

 

“Nick Bunting – Managing a Multiple 3-4 Defense EP 005” Run The Power: A Football Coach’s Podcast

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Run The Power (RTP) episode 005 is a talk with Nick Bunting, Defensive Coordinator at Holland Hall HS in Tulsa, OK. Coach Bunting played at Holland Hall before becoming a 4 year starter at the University of Tulsa at Linebacker. Nick started as a true freshman, earning Freshman All-American honors, setting the tone for a standout career under Todd Graham and Keith Patterson. Coach Bunting began his coaching career at Bartlesville under Ron Smith. He moved to Jenks in 2012 as LB coach where he won a state championship working for Allan Trimble and Keith Riggs before moving to his current job as DC for Holland Hall since the 2013 season. Listen along as Rowdy and Walz ask Coach Bunt about his multiple 3-4 defense, his use of hybrid players to tailor his defense to fit his best 11 players, and his experiences working and learning for an unbelievable network of coaches to hone his philosophy and ability to build relationships with athletes and push them to their maximum ability. Coach Bunt also runs 5 Star Football Academy to train defensive players, especially linebackers, on the nuances and fundamentals of the position. You can follow Coach Bunt on Twitter @coachbunt and @5starfbacademy. Hope you enjoy!

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This episode of Run The Power podcast is brought to you by Team Attack Academy. Team Attack Academy is an online football development site for football players and coaches of all levels. It is the most powerful teaching tool introduced into the game today to raise level of playing and coaching football. After using Team Attack Academy your athletes and coaches will outplay, outwork and outsmart their opponents guaranteed. Visit Team Attack Academy at https://teamattackacademy.com

Practice Solutions

Several of us are probably working on those resolutions and improvements for next season. I have had a few coaches reach out to me about this topic, so I decided to give my take on some possible solutions because we have had the same problems getting our 2-way players and our backup players enough reps in practice at various stops I’ve made along the way.

The best solution I have seen: Split Defensive and Offensive Emphasis Practices.

Why Split Practices? At the end of the day, it is all about player development, program development, and winning (getting our best players on the field). This practice system allowed us to get all 3 goals accomplished.

Weekly Practice Schedule

WEEKLY PRACTICE SCHEDULE
Weekly In-Season Practice Schedule

Obviously most of our heavy work and fundamental development is getting done on Monday and Tuesday. This is the emphasis of this article.

Monday/Tuesday Practice Schedule

OFFENSIVE DAY
Defensive Practice Schedule – Offensive Practice Schedule

So here is the schedule for a sample Offensive Day. This means Offense has 70 minutes of practice to script, and Offense has the choice of ALL PLAYERS it wishes to have for VARSITY OFFENSE. Now, we would have some Offense Only players and some Defense Only players. They would stay on that side of the ball for the entire practice. Any CROSSOVER PLAYERS (2-WAY PLAYERS) would go to OFFENSE first since it is an Offensive Day. All JV/Sophomore/Developmental Players would go to Defense.

Segments like Inside Run/1 on 1, 7 on 7/Pass Rush, and Team Offense, we would come together and service/scrimmage each other as best we could. Many times I would take the Scout Team because our defensive coaches didn’t know what defense the opposing team was running, so I would let them stay with their older defensive specialists to work  on their game plan and technique. It made things move smoothly, and I didn’t have to explain a card/read to the coach and the players.

Offensively, we ALWAYS had 2 huddles going in Inside Run, 7×7, and Team. We maximized reps for all of our developmental guys in every segment. This is why we were able to reload with players each year (program development).

We would switch emphasis after our Team periods, and Crossovers would head to Defense for 35 minutes of whatever they needed. As an offensive coach, I would coach our Scout units HARD for our Defense to get a look. It was also 2 huddles of Scout Offense, so we had more young guys getting great reps vs our 1 Defense.

We would finish with Special Teams for 20 minutes, giving several units (OL, QB especially) more time for corrections and Indy work as well at the end of practice.

Tuesday, we would rinse and repeat but flip Defense and Offense. We were able to develop our Crossover players and our JV/Second Unit players in a multitude of ways.

I hope you got a nugget or two from this article. If you have questions or comments, please leave them below or contact me. Thanks for reading, and PAY IT FORWARD as a BALL COACH!

“Clint & Jerrod Anderson – Training and Developing Offensive Linemen EP 004” Run The Power : A Football Coach’s Podcast

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On this episode of Run The Power (RTP) we talked with Jerrod and Clint Anderson. The Anderson brothers grew up in Allen TX. Both went on to start multiple years at the collegiate level across the Offensive Line. Most recently, Jerrod and Clint own and operate Lineman Performance Association, which looks to create equipment specific for offensive linemen in the weight room. Their best selling product, the SoupBone, is an attachment for a standard weightlifting bar to make landmine movement more specific to offensive linemen. The Anderson’s also operate Anderson OLine Academy. Anderson OLine Academy trains offensive lineman looking to perfect their craft in both Texas and Oklahoma.  Me and Walz talked to the Anderson’s about Anderson OLine Academy, working with Lecharles Bentley, their current and future line of products at Lineman Performance Association, their careers as collegiate offensive lineman, what they work on with their athletes, and even a little about nutrition. Go to andersonolineacademy.com to visit Anderson OLine Academy and linemanperformance.com to visit Lineman Performance Association. You can follow them both on Twitter @Anderson_OLine & @LPAStrength. Hope you enjoy!

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This episode of Run The Power podcast is brought to you by Team Attack Academy. Team Attack Academy is an online football development site for football players and coaches of all levels. It is the most powerful teaching tool introduced into the game today to raise level of playing and coaching football. After using Team Attack Academy your athletes and coaches will outplay, outwork and outsmart their opponents guaranteed. Visit Team Attack Academy at https://teamattackacademy.com

“Episode 003 Coach Ryan Mullaney” Run The Power : A Football Coach’s Podcast

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In this episode of Run the Power (RTP) we talk football with Coach Ryan Mullaney! Coach Mulls is currently the Run Game Coordinator at Denver Lutheran HS. He played DE for the Minnesota Vikings, Chicago Bears, Kansas City Chiefs, and LA Rams, in addition to stints in the CFL and USFL. Before his NFL career, Coach Mulls was a LB at UNLV and the University of Colorado. He has been HC at Denver South HS, DC at Evergreen HS, DC at Cole College, and DL coach at Colorado School of Mines. He has also been a successful business leader in the telecom industry, and currently he is CEO of Team Attack Academy, LLC, an online athlete and coach development company. In this episode of RTP, we talk about Coach Mulls’ varied background in the game, Team Attack Academy and the advantages it creates for programs and players, and developing of your coaching art, leadership, and assistant coach or player management. You can Follow Coach Mullaney on Twitter

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This episode of the podcast is brought to you by Team Attack Academy. Team Attack Academy is an online football development site for football players and coaches of all levels. It is the most powerful teaching tool introduced into the game today to raise level of playing and coaching football. After using Team Attack Academy your athletes and coaches will outplay, outwork and outsmart their opponents guaranteed. Visit Team Attack Academy at https://teamattackacademy.com

“Episode 002 Coach Tony Shiffman” Run The Power : A Football Coach’s Podcast

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In this episode of Run the Power (RTP) we were lucky enough to to talk football with Coach Tony Shiffman! Coach Shiffman is a former offensive line coach and is now the Head Football Coach at Fort Madison High School in Iowa, and Co-Creator of HogFBChat on twitter. In this episode of Run the Power we talk about HogFBChat (every Offensive Line coaches favorite part about Mondays) the transition from O-Line coach to Head coach, and the special bond that football coaches feel with their offensive line group. This is a great episode for aspiring Offensive Line, and Head Football Coaches alike! You can Follow Coach Shiffman on Twitter @CoachShiffman and you can check out and participate with the HogFBChat every Monday night at 8. You can also find more information on the Hog Football Chat Clinic at Rhodes College in Memphis on March 10th on their website https://hogfbchat.net

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This episode of the podcast is brought to you by Team Attack Academy. Team Attack Academy is an online football development site for football players and coaches of all levels. It is the most powerful teaching tool introduced into the game today to raise level of playing and coaching football. After using Team Attack Academy your athletes and coaches will outplay, outwork and outsmart their opponents guaranteed. Visit Team Attack Academy at https://teamattackacademy.com

JR Conrad

This week I am introducing a new format to the blog that I hope to bring back monthly. I am extremely fortunate to have made several connections with former offensive lineman, offensive line trainers and offensive line coaches throughout my playing and coaching career. I look up to these men and lean on them heavily in my coaching profession. In an attempt for me to gather even more information from the men that are at the top of there given profession, I decided to reach out to them and ask them if they would fill out a questionnaire. It is geared towards questions I had about offensive line and coaching in general. In this new “interview” format, I will introduce the guest that was generous with their time and knowledge to answer these questions for us. Then, I will get out of the way and let their answers do the talking by posting their answers with my questions. I hope you guys enjoy and get as much out of this as I have!!

JR Conrad – I first heard about JR from my dad several years ago. Dad knew JR and always talked very highly of him. He said that JR was an extremely tough guy and a great offensive lineman. JR started 46 games on the offensive line at the University of Oklahoma. He would then go on to get drafted by the New England Patriots.

It wasn’t until 3 years ago however, that I finally met JR. I was lucky enough to be asked by Loren Montgomery, the head football coach at Bixby High School, to help work his Eastern Oklahoma O-Line & D-Line camp. This camp has been around for many years and luckily for me, JR had become a yearly staple at this camp. For the last 3 years at this camp I’ve gotten the chance to sit back and watch JR coach high school offensive lineman and it was an amazing learning experience for me. It was unreal to me how he could get such a large buy in from a bunch of kids that he had just met. Also The amount of effort they were willing to give at his station was amazing. An extremely impressive thing to me is how willing he is to adapt to new and better technique. Every year I’m there I see him using a new toy from the Lecharles Bentley toolbox. If he sees a better way to do something he is willing and eager to adopt it into his players training. This is something that you don’t see very often from as decorated of an offensive lineman as JR was. He was after all, the first true freshmen to ever start at Center for the Sooners.

Watching him work with the kids and coach Offensive Line was extremely impressive! But the thing that truly blew me away was listening to him speak to the kids at the camp. If you have not had the chance to hear this man speak, you are missing out! He speaks of a brotherhood, of a love for the game and the position, and he speaks of his faith. Listening to JR for 10 minutes will have you ready to go in to battle, and call up your old teammates from high school all at the same time. You can tell that he is genuinely speaking from the heart and it’s what impresses me most about JR.

JR now works with Power Lift and trains some of the top offensive lineman in the Oklahoma City area at his Trench Mafia O-Line Academy. You can follow him on twitter @JRConrad64. Below are his responses to our “interview”.

 

Q1. What’s something you believe about the offensive line (or football) that the majority of your peers disagree with?

A1. 2 things O-Lineman need more than anything is toughness and staying power. I always hear how centers must be this quick, guards need to weight this much, and tackles need to be this tall; truth is all bodies are different torso length, arm length, barrel chest guy?  Size is awesome strength is a necessity that comes on a platform in a rack as you age in a program.  But tough guys who just keep working usually win jobs.

Q2. What was the most productive run play that you ran this year?  Why do think you ran it so well this year?

A2. I cannot answer this one running Trench Mafia is a bit different than game planning for a certain scheme or front.  But you know me and it would be counter of all kinds, huge fan of a double to backside with a puller.

Q3. If you could go back and give advice to yourself at 25 about coaching, what would it be?

A3. Never forget it’s a Coaches job to show young man what he can become, we all know what we are but don’t always see what we can become. Football will do more for the players than they will do for the game.   Last learn always learn so you can teach it better.

Q4. What is the most important thing you look for when hiring an offensive line coach?

A4. I have done this twice first time I hired a former player of mine that I trusted and he did a great job he knew how I did things and said things and he did a great job.  Next time hired a guy who never played a down of football but he had a health issue related to that and he loved ball, he was a manager a film guy a volunteer coach and he wanted to learn.  So I found myself relearning and teaching and then I would hear him present different and he did a great job.  Totally different worlds and both worked great.  Find a grinder for O-Line it’s a lot high numbers, a lot of props needed and got to keep guys moving.

Q5. When watching another offensive line play, what would they do that would make you think highly of that offensive line coach?

A5. For me it would start on film study I want to see that guys can do the 3 basic things alignment, assignment, execution so if the scheme makes sense to what and where guys are going that means they are taking film, or walk through to the field.  As an O-Lineman I want to see consistent stances, stagger, splits, body language after plays in the huddle, techniques from Indy periods carrying over? Of course EFFORT / FINISH.

Q6. If you could meet any coach (living or dead) and talk to them for 1 hour who would it be and why?

A6. I would have to say spend that hour with LeCharles Bentley. I have spent some time with him and I just feel like he is really on the forefront in unifying the island of misfit toys.   

Q7. What’s the worst advice you hear the most that is given to Offensive lineman or coaches?

A7. Just get out there and cut them off then punch how hard is that?  I hear this all the time frustrates me to no end specific skill for a specific task.  Must be very clear and detailed!

Q8. What has become more important to you in the last few years and what has become less important in coaching offensive line?

A8. Dialing in Skills Acquisition vs doing tons of ladders and foot work that doesn’t apply to our foot position at any time on the field.

Q9. What is the best or most worthwhile investment you’ve made in your coaching career?

A9. LeCharles newsletter,  access to articles, videos, 3D simulations, nutrition, equipment.

Q10. Who comes to mind when you hear the term successful coach?

A10. Allan Trimble Jenks Head Coach success at the highest level, kept balance between work and family, and his Coaches and Players rave about him as a Coach but mostly about the man. Humble and kind I truly admire him.

Q11. Coaching is teaching if you had to teach at a high school what would you teach?

A11. Classroom setting OK History being Native American great way to share some Indian culture with everyone. But probably would enjoy the weight room full time to share in the joy of hard work equals success.

Q12. Who was your biggest mentor while you grew as a coach?

A12. Charlie North been a great resource for all things from fund raising to day to day schedule and X’s & O’s

Q13. If you only allowed to go into a game with 3 run plays what would they be?

A13. Inside Zone / Power   / Counter

Q14. What book have or would you recommend most to Coaches?

A14. Energy Bus – Jon Gordon

Q15. What is your favorite football movie?

A15. Remember the Titans

Q16. What’s the best piece of advice that you ever gotten?

A16. If you are going to show your backside on the sidelines, you might as well wear see through pants.  Act right on the sidelines!

Q17. If you were only allowed to use 2 pass blocking drills the entire season, what would they be?

A17. Kick Plate slow / Tom Tom for speed

Q18. If your child told you they were going into the coaching profession, for any sport at any level, what advice would you give them.

A18. Grow thick skin, coach your personality, and then I would tell them how proud of them I am Coaches/Teachers impact lives.

Q19. What type of music do you listen to when breaking down film?

A19. Trench Mafia Sessions are known to rock a mix if the dudes are working they can control music, if not no tunes!

Game-Changing Stats Coaches May Be Overlooking

What if the stats coaches normally use to analyze football games are really not that telling? What if the game has changed? What if coaches are biased to certain information and it clouds their vision of important indicators in football games? Is there a better way for coaches to self-scout and create goals each week for your team to give them the best chance to win?

SportSource Analytics is a sports-focused analytics company dedicated to enabling better decisions with better data through the use of customized platforms and services.

I met these guys at the AFCA Convention in Nashville a few years back, and I’ve been a big fan of their work ever since. They are the official data analytics platform for the College Football Playoff, and they provide platforms, consulting, and data services for many major college programs and conferences. They offer insight that few can, and I highly recommend their services and Twitter feed.

I was able to ask them a few questions this past week, and they gave some great ideas for BALL COACHES to change their thinking, scouting, coaching, and goal setting week in and week out.

What are some of the most under-utilized statistics for measuring OFFENSIVE success that coaches should be focusing more toward in their preparation?

It’s all about being efficient and being explosive. Given that, we advise that coaches put a lot of focus on the following statistics:
P & 10 efficiency: One of the most important plays in football
1st & 10 efficiency: Over 40% of football is played on 1st and 10. If you aren’t successful on 1st and 10, it’s hard to be a great offense
Walsh Ranking: Bill Walsh said that great offenses are the best at avoiding 3rd down. What percent of your first downs are coming on 1st down, 2nd down, 3rd down. What percent of your plays are on 1st down, 2nd down, 3rd down? Best offenses don’t wait until 3rd down to gain first downs
Points Per Possession: How efficient are you being with the ball?
Plays Per Point: Helps measure both efficiency and explosiveness
Quality Play Index: We have what we call a quality play index. This looks at what percent of your plays were Good and Great plays. A Good Play is any play that gains a 1st down, results in a TD, or results in first down. Great Plays are any plays of 25+ yards and/or a TD.

What are some of the most under-utilized statistics for measuring DEFENSIVE success that coaches should be focusing more toward in their preparation?

Defensive Mayhem Index: This measures what percent of the time a defense gets a sack, TFL, or a turnover.
Points Per Possession
Plays Per Point
3 and Out Percentage: What percent of opponent’s drives are three and out
Trips to the RZ: Red Zone efficiency can be a bit overrated. The goal is not to allow the opponent to get to the Red Zone.
P & 10 Defense: How often are you keeping opponent’s from being efficient on P&10
3rd Down YTG: Best way to be good on 3rd down is to put offenses in situations where it is difficult to gain a first down. What is the average Yards To Gain on 3rd down for your opponents.

What statistics are the greatest indicators of winning and losing?

Winning the Efficiency Battle
Winning the First Half
Winning the Big Play Battle
Winning the Trips to Red Zone Battle
Winning the Tackle for Loss Battle 
Scoring First
Be Good on the Firsts

When hiring coaches, what are the most important analytics/attributes to consider from the research you have performed?

It’s all about looking at the job a coach has done relative to the situation he took over. Where did they get better or worse? How much impact did the coach in question have to do with that improvement? Also, looking for consistency so we don’t fall prey to a What You See Is What Is bias. Good coaches can have down years and bad coaches can have up years.  We also like to test how coordinator dependent a coach is. When it comes to using data in the hiring process, it has to be a very holistic approach that takes a very deep dive into the data.

I think this is some fascinating insight from SportSource Analytics. It has helped mold and change the way I evaluate my coaching style and emphasis and how I evaluate the formula needed to give athletes the best chance to be successful. Focusing on the most important situations in football can give any team the edge needed to win more games, especially when the talent differential is minimal. Ball Coaches search and find ways to win ball games.

I hope you enjoyed this article. Leave some comments/questions to discuss further!